ACTOR-ACTOR INTERACTION ANALYSIS – BLUEPRINT

eJournal: uffmm.org,
ISSN 2567-6458, 13.February 2019
Email: info@uffmm.org
Author: Gerd Doeben-Henisch
Email: gerd@doeben-henisch.de

Last corrections: 14.February 2019 (add some more keywords; added  emphasizes for central words)

CONTEXT

An overview to the enhanced AAI theory  version 2 you can find here.  In this post we talk about the   chapter dealing with the blueprint  of the whole  AAI analysis process (but leaving out the topic of actor models (AM) and the topic of simulation. For these topics see other posts).

THE AAI ANALYSIS BLUEPRINT

Blueprint of the whole AAI analysis process including the epistemological assumptions. Not shown here is the whole topic of actor models (AM) and as well simulation.
Blueprint of the whole AAI analysis process including the epistemological assumptions. Not shown here is the whole topic of actor models (AM) and as well simulation.

The Actor-Actor Interaction (AAI) analysis is understood here as part of an  embracing  systems engineering process (SEP), which starts with the statement of a problem (P) which includes a vision (V) of an improved alternative situation. It has then to be analyzed how such a new improved situation S+ looks like; how one can realize certain tasks (T)  in an improved way.

DRIVING ACTORS

The driving actors for such an AAI analysis are some stakeholders which communicate a problem P and a vision V and some experts with at least some AAI experts, which take the lead in the process of elaborating the vision.

EPISTEMOLOGY

It has to be taken into account that the driving actors are able to do this job because they  have in their bodies brains (BRs) which in turn include  some consciousness (CNS). The processes and states beyond the consciousness are here called ‘unconscious‘ and the set of all these unconscious processes is called ‘the Unconsciousness’ (UCNS).

SEMIOTIC SUBSYSTEM

An important set of substructures of the unconsciousness are those which enable symbolic language systems with so-called expressions (L) on one side and so-called non-expressions (~L) on the other. Embedded in a meaning relation (MNR) does the set of non-expressions ~L  function as the meaning (MEAN) of the expressions L, written as a mapping MNR: L <—> ~L. Depending from the involved sensors the expressions L can occur either as acoustic events L_spk, or as visual patterns written L_txt or visual patterns as pictures L_pict or even in other formats, which will not discussed here. The non-expressions can occur in every format which the brain can handle.

While written (symbolic) expressions L are only associated with the intended meaning through encoded mappings in the brain,  the spoken expressions L_spk as well as the pictorial ones L_pict can show some similarities with the intended meaning. Within acoustic  expressions one can ‘imitate‘ some sounds which are part of a meaning; even more can the pictorial expressions ‘imitate‘ the visual experience of the intended meaning to a high degree, but clearly not every kind of meaning.

DEFINING THE MAIN POINT OF REFERENCE

Because the space of possible problems and visions it nearly infinite large one has to define for a certain process the problem of the actual process together with the vision of a ‘better state of the affairs’. This is realized by a description of he problem in a problem document D_p as well as in a vision statement D_v. Because usually a vision is not without a given context one has to add all the constraints (C) which have to be taken into account for the possible solution.  Examples of constraints are ‘non-functional requirements’ (NFRs) like “safety” or “real time” or “without barriers” (for handicapped people).

AAI ANALYSIS – BASIC PROCEDURE

If the AAI check has been successful and there is at least one task T to be done in an assumed environment ENV and there are at least one executing actor A_exec in this task as well as an assisting actor A_ass then the AAI analysis can start.

ACTOR STORY (AS)

The main task is to elaborate a complete description of a process which includes a start state S* and a goal state S+, where  the participating executive actors A_exec can reach the goal state S+ by doing some actions. While the imagined process p_v  is a virtual (= cognitive/ mental) model of an intended real process p_e, this intended virtual model p_e can only be communicated by a symbolic expressions L embedded in a meaning relation. Thus the elaboration/ construction of the intended process will be realized by using appropriate expressions L embedded in a meaning relation. This can be understood as a basic mapping of sensor based perceptions of the supposed real world into some abstract virtual structures automatically (unconsciously) computed by the brain. A special kind of this mapping is the case of measurement.

In this text especially three types of symbolic expressions L will be used: (i) pictorial expressions L_pict, (ii) textual expressions of a natural language L_txt, and (iii) textual expressions of a mathematical language L_math. The meaning part of these symbolic expressions as well as the expressions itself will be called here an actor story (AS) with the different modes  pictorial AS (PAS), textual AS (TAS), as well as mathematical AS (MAS).

TAR AND AAR

If the actor story is completed (in a certain version v_i) then one can extract from the story the input-output profiles of every participating actor. This list represents the task-induced actor requirements (TAR).  If one is looking for concrete real persons for doing the job of an executing actor the TAR can be used as a benchmark for assessing candidates for this job. The profiles of the real persons are called here actor-actor induced requirements (AAR), that is the real profile compared with the ideal profile of the TAR. If the ‘distance’ between AAR and TAR is below some threshold then the candidate has either to be rejected or one can offer some training to improve his AAR; the other option is to  change the conditions of the TAR in a way that the TAR is more closer to the AARs.

The TAR is valid for the executive actors as well as for the assisting actors A_ass.

CONSTRAINTS CHECK

If the actor story has in some version V_i a certain completion one has to check whether the different constraints which accompany the vision document are satisfied through the story: AS_vi |- C.

Such an evaluation is only possible if the constraints can be interpreted with regard to the actor story AS in version vi in a way, that the constraints can be decided.

For many constraints it can happen that the constraints can not or not completely be decided on the level of the actor story but only in a later phase of the systems engineering process, when the actor story will be implemented in software and hardware.

MEASURING OF USABILITY

Using the actor story as a benchmark one can test the quality of the usability of the whole process by doing usability tests.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AAI THEORY V2 – AS –VIRTUAL MEANING AND AS

eJournal: uffmm.org,
ISSN 2567-6458, 29.Januar 2019
Email: info@uffmm.org
Author: Gerd Doeben-Henisch
Email: gerd@doeben-henisch.de

Last Change: 1.February 2019 (Corrections)

CONTEXT

An overview to the enhanced AAI theory  version 2 you can find here.  In this post we talk about the fifth chapter dealing with the generation of the actor story (AS), and here the special topic of the virtual meaning and the actor story.

VIRTUAL MEANING AND ACTOR STORY

  1. In a textual actor story (TAS) using the symbolic expressions L0 of some everyday language one can describe a state with a finite set of facts which should be decidable ‘in principle’ when related to the supposed external empirical environment of the problem P. Thus the constraint of ‘operational decidability‘ with regard to an empirical external environment imposes some constraint of the kinds of symbolic expressions which can be used. If there is more than only one state (which is the usual case) then one has to provide a list of ‘possible changes‘. Each change is described with  a symbolic expression L0x. The content of a change is at least one fact which will change between the ‘given’ state and the ‘succeeding’ state. Thus the virtual meaning of an actor must enable the actor to distinguish between a ‘given state’ q_now  and a possible ‘succeeding state’ q_next. There can be more than one possible change with regard to a given state q_now. Thus a textual actor story (TAS) is a set of states connected by changes, all represented as finite collections of symbolic expressions.
  2. In a pictorial actor story (PAS) using the graphical  expressions Lg of some everyday pictorial langue one can describe a state with a finite set of facts realized as pictures of objects, properties as well as relations between these objects.  The graphs of the objects can be enhanced by graphs including symbolic expressions L0  of some everyday language.  Again it should be   decidable ‘in principle’ whether these pictorial facts can be  related to the suppose external empirical environment of the problem P. Thus the constraint of ‘operational decidability’ with regard to an empirical external environment imposes some constraint of the kinds of symbolic expressions which can be used. If there is more than only one state (which is the usual case) then one has to provide a list of ‘possible changes’. Each change is described with  an   expression Lgx. The content of a change is at least one fact which will change between the ‘given’ state and an ‘succeeding’ state. Thus the virtual meaning of an actor must enable the actor to distinguish between a ‘given state’ q_now  and a possible ‘succeeding state’ q_next. There can be more than one possible change with regard to a given state q_now. Thus a pictorial actor story (TAS) is a set of states connected by changes, all represented as finite collections of graphical  expressions.
  3. In the case of a mathematical actor story (MAS) one has to distinguish two cases: (i) a complete formal description or (ii) a graphical presentation enhanced with symbolic expressions.
  4. In case (i) it is similar to the textual mode but replacing the symbolic expressions L0 of  some everyday   langue with the symbolic expressions Lm of some mathematical language. In this book we are using predicate logic syntax with a new semantics. In case (ii) one describes the  actor story as a mathematical directed graph. The nodes (vertices) of the graph are understood as ‘states’ and the arrows connecting the nodes are  understood as changes. A node representing a state can be attached to a finite set   of facts, where a fact is a symbolic expression Lm  representing  objects, properties as well as relations between these objects.   Again it should be   decidable ‘in principle’ whether these facts  can be  related to the suppose external empirical environment of the problem P. Thus the constraint of ‘operational decidability’ with regard to an empirical external environment imposes some constraint of the kinds of symbolic expressions which can be used. If there is more than only one state (which is the usual case) then one has to use arrows which are labeled by symbolic change expressions Lmx.    The content of a change is at least one fact which will change between the ‘given’ state and an ‘succeeding’ state. Thus the virtual meaning of an actor must enable the actor to distinguish between a ‘given state’ q_now  and a possible ‘succeeding state’ q_next. There can be more than one possible change with regard to a given state q_now.
  5. If the complete actor story is given, then there is no need for the additional change expressions LX because one can infer the changes from the  pairs of the succeeding states directly. But if one wants to ‘generate’ an actor story beginning with the start state then one needs the list of change expressions.

AAI THEORY V2 – AS – MEANING: REAL AND VIRTUAL

eJournal: uffmm.org,
ISSN 2567-6458, 29.Januar 2019
Email: info@uffmm.org
Author: Gerd Doeben-Henisch
Email: gerd@doeben-henisch.de

CONTEXT

An overview to the enhanced AAI theory  version 2 you can find here.  In this post we talk about the fifth chapter dealing with the generation of the actor story (AS), and here the special topic of the meaning of (symbolic) expressions.

MEANING: REAL AND VIRTUAL

  1. In semiotic terminology  the ‘meaning‘ of a symbolic expression corresponds to the image of the mapping from symbolic expressions (L) into something else (non-L). This mapping is located in that system which is using this mapping. We can call this system a ‘semiotic system‘.
  2. For the generation of an actor story we assume that the AAI experts as well as all the other actors collaborating with the AAI actors are input-output systems with changeable internal states (IS) as well as a behavior function (phi), written as phi: I x IS —> IS x O.
  3. These actors are embedded in an empirical environment (ENV) which is continuously changing.
  4. Parts of the environment can interact with the actors by inducing physical state-changes in parts of the actors (Stimuli (S), Input, (I)) as well as receiving physical responses from the actors (Responses (R), output (O)) which change parts of the environmental states.
  5. Interpreting these actors as ‘semiotic systems’ implies that the actors can receive as input symbolic expressions (L) as well as non-symbolic events and they can output symbolic expressions (L) as well as some non-symbolic events (non-L). Furthermore the mapping from symbolic expressions into something else is assumed to happen ‘inside‘ the system.
  6. From a 3rd-person view one can distinguish the empirical environment external to the actor as well as the empirical states ‘inside’ the system (typically investigated by Physiology with many sub-disciplines).
  7. The internal states on the cellular level have a small subset called ‘brain’ (less than 1% of all cellular elements).  A  subset of the brain cells is enabling what in a 1st person view is called ‘consciousness‘.  The ‘content’ of the consciousness consists of ‘phenomena‘ which are not ’empirical’ in the usual sense of ’empirical’.  Using the consciousness as point of reference everything else of the actor which is not part of the conscious is ‘not conscious‘ or ‘unconscious‘. The ‘unconsciousness‘ is then the set of all non-conscious states of the actor (which means in the biological case of human sapiens more than 99% of all body states).
  8. As empirical sciences have revealed there exist functional relations between empirical states of the external environment (S_emp) and the set of externally caused internal  unconscious input states of the actor (IS_emp_uc).
  9. The internally caused unconscious input states (IS_emp_uc) are further processed and mapped in a variety of internal unconscious states (IS_emp_uc_abstr), which are more ‘general’ as the original input states. Thus subsets of internally cause unconscious  internal states IS_emp_uc  can be elements of the more abstract internal states IS_emp_uc_abstr.
  10. These internal unconscious states are part of ‘networks‘ and parts of different kinds of ‘hierarchies‘.
  11. There are many different kinds of internal operations working on these internal structures including the input states.
  12. Parts of the internal structures can function as ‘meaning‘ (M) for other parts of internal structures which function as ‘symbolic expressions‘ (L). Symbolic expressions together with the meaning constituting elements can be used from an actor (seen as a semiotic system) as a ‘symbolic language‘ whose observable part are the ‘symbols’ (written, spoken, gestures, …) and whose non-observable part is the mapping relation (encoding) from symbols into the internal meaning elements.
  13. The primary meaning of a language is therefore a ‘virtual world of states inside the actor‘ compared to the ‘external empirical world‘. Parts of the virtual meaning world can correspond to parts of the empirical world outside. To control such an important relationship one needs commonly defined empirical measurement procedures (MP) which are producing external empirical events which can be repeatedly perceived by a population of actors, which can compare these processes and events with their 1st person conscious phenomena (PH). If it is possible for an actor (an observer) to identify those phenomena which correspond to the external measurement events than it is possible (in principle) to define that subset of Phenomena (PH_emp) which are phenomena but are correlated with events in the external empirical world.  Usually those phenomena which correspond to empirical events external PH_emp are a true subset of the set of all possible Phenomena, written as PH_emp ⊂ PH.
  14. While the empirical phenomena PH_emp are ‘concrete‘ phenomena are the non-empirical phenomena PH_abs = PH-PH_emp ‘abstract‘ in the sense that an empirical phenomenon p_emp can be an element of a non-empirical phenomenon p_abs if p_emp is not new.
  15. While the virtual meaning of a symbolic language is realized by abstract structures which can be ‘cited’ in the consciousness as p_abs,  the empirical meaning   instead occurs as concrete structures which can be ‘cited’ by the consciousness.
  16. All meaning elements can occur as part of a virtual spatial structure (VR) and as part of a virtual timely structure (VT).
  17. There is no 1-to-1 mapping from the spatial and timely structures of the external empirical world into the virtual internal world of meanings.
  18. If it is possible to correlate virtual meaning structures with external empirical structures we call this ’empirical soundness’ or ’empirical truth’.

AAI THEORY V2 – Actor Story (AS)

eJournal: uffmm.org,
ISSN 2567-6458, 28.Januar 2019
Email: info@uffmm.org
Author: Gerd Doeben-Henisch
Email: gerd@doeben-henisch.de

CONTEXT

An overview to the enhanced AAI theory  version 2 you can find here.  In this post we talk about the fifth chapter dealing with the generation of the actor story (AS).

ACTOR STORY

To get from the problem P to an improved configuration S measured by some expectation  E needs a process characterized by a set of necessary states Q which are connected by necessary changes X. Such a process can be described with the aid of  an actor story AS.

  1. The target of an actor story (AS) is a full specification of all identified necessary tasks T which lead from a start state q* to a goal state q+, including all possible and necessary changes X between the different states M.
  2. A state is here considered as a finite set of facts (F) which are structured as an expression from some language L distinguishing names of objects (like  ‘D1’, ‘Un1’, …) as well as properties of objects (like ‘being open’, ‘being green’, …) or relations between objects (like ‘the user stands before the door’). There can also e a ‘negation’ like ‘the door is not open’. Thus a collection of facts like ‘There is a door D1’ and ‘The door D1 is open’ can represent a state.
  3. Changes from one state q to another successor state q’ are described by the object whose action deletes previous facts or creates new facts.
  4. In this approach at least three different modes of an actor story will be distinguished:
    1. A textual mode generating a Textual Actor Story (TAS): In a textual mode a text in some everyday language (e.g. in English) describes the states and changes in plain English. Because in the case of a written text the meaning of the symbols is hidden in the heads of the writers it can be of help to parallelize the written text with the pictorial mode.
    2. A pictorial mode generating a Pictorial Actor Story (PAS). In a pictorial mode the drawings represent the main objects with their properties and relations in an explicit visual way (like a Comic Strip). The drawings can be enhanced by fragments of texts.
    3. A mathematical mode generating a Mathematical Actor Story (MAS): this can be done either (i) by  a pictorial graph with nodes and edges as arrows associated with formal expressions or (ii)  by a complete formal structure without any pictorial elements.
    4. For every mode it has to be shown how an AAI expert can generate an actor story out of the virtual cognitive world of his brain and how it is possible to decide the empirical soundness of the actor story.