LIBRARIES AS ACTORS. WHAT ABOUT THE CITIZENS?

eJournal: uffmm.org, ISSN 2567-6458, 19.Januar 2019
Email: info@uffmm.org
Author: Gerd Doeben-Henisch
Email: gerd@doeben-henisch.de

CONTEXT

In this blog a new approach to the old topic of ‘Human-Machine Interaction (HMI)’ is developed turning the old Human-Machine dyad into the many-to-many relation of ‘Actor-Actor Interaction (AAI)’. And, moreover, in this new AAI approach the classical ‘top-down’ approach of engineering is expanded with a truly ‘bottom-up’ approach locating the center of development in the distributed knowledge of a population of users assisted by the AAI experts.

PROBLEM

From this perspective it is interesting to see how on an international level the citizens of a community/ city are not at the center of research, but again the city and its substructures – here public libraries – are called ‘actors’ while the citizens as such are only an anonymous matter of driving these structures to serve the international ‘buzz word’ of a ‘smart city’ empowered by the ‘Internet of Things (IoT)’.

This perspective is published in a paper from Shannon Mersand et al. (2019) which reviews all the main papers available focusing on the role of public libraries in cities. It seems – I could not check by myself the search space — that the paper gives a good overview of this topic in 48 cited papers.

The main idea underlined by the authors is that public libraries are already so-called ‘anchor institutions’ in a community which either already include or could be extended as “spaces for innovation, collaboration and hands on learning that are open to adults and younger children as well”. (p.3312) Or, another formulation “that libraries are consciously working to become a third space; a place for learning in multiple domains and that provides resources in the form of both materials and active learning opportunities”. (p.3312)

The paper is rich on details but for the context of the AAI paradigm I am interested only on the general perspective how the roles of the actors are described which are identified as responsible for the process of problem solving.

The in-official problem of cities is how to organize the city to respond to the needs of its citizens. There are some ‘official institutions’ which ‘officially’ have to fulfill this job. In democratic societies these institutions are ‘elected’. Ideally these official institutions are the experts which try to solve the problem for the citizens, which are the main stakeholder! To help in this job of organizing the ‘best fitting city-layout’ there exists usually at any point of time a bunch of infrastructures. The modern ‘Internet of Things (IoT)’ is only one of many possible infrastructures.

To proceed in doing the job of organizing the ‘best fitting city-layout’ there are generally two main strategies: ‘top-down’ as usual in most cities or ‘bottom-‘ in nearly no cities.

In the top-down approach the experts organize the processes of the cities more or less on their own. They do not really include the expertise of their citizens, not their knowledge, not their desires and visions. The infrastructures are provided from a birds perspective and an abstract systems thinking.

The case of the public libraries is matching this top-down paradigm. At the end of their paper the authors classify public libraries not only as some ‘infrastructure’ but “… recognize the potential of public libraries … and to consider them as a key actor in the governance of the smart community”. (p.3312) The term ‘actor’ is very strong. This turns an institution into an actor with some autonomy of deciding what to do. The users of the library, the citizens, the primary stakeholder of the city, are not seen as actors, they are – here – the material to ‘feed’ – to use a picture — the actor library which in turn has to serve the governance of the ‘smart community’.

DISCUSSION

Yes, this comment can be understood as a bit ‘harsh’ because one can read the text of the authors a bit different in the sense that the citizens are not only some matter to ‘feed’ the actor library but to see the public library as an ‘environment’ for the citizens which find in the libraries many possibilities to learn and empower themselves. In this different reading the citizens are clearly seen as actors too.

This different reading is possible, but within an overall ‘top-down’ approach the citizens as actors are not really included as actors but only as passive receivers of infrastructure offers; in a top-down approach the main focus are the infrastructures, and from all the infrastructures the ‘smart’ structures are most prominent, the internet of things.

If one remembers two previous papers of Mila Gascó (2016) and Mila Gascó-Hernandez (2018) then this is a bit astonishing because in these earlier papers she has analyzed that the ‘failure’ of the smart technology strategy in Barcelona was due to the fact that the city government (the experts in our framework) did not include sufficiently enough the citizens as actors!

From the point of view of the AAI paradigm this ‘hiding of the citizens as main actors’ is only due to the inadequate methodology of a top-down approach where a truly bottom-up approach is needed.

In the Oct-2, 2018 version of the AAI theory the bottom-up approach is not yet included. It has been worked out in the context of the new research project about ‘City Planning and eGaming‘  which in turn has been inspired by Mila Gascó-Hernandez!

REFERENCES

  • S.Mersand, M. Gasco-Hernandez, H. Udoh, and J.R. Gil-Garcia. “Public libraries as anchor institutions in smart communities: Current practices and future development”, Proceedings of the 52nd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, pages 3305 – 3314, 2019. URL https: //hdl.handle.net/10125/59766 .

  • Mila Gascó, “What makes a city smart? lessons from Barcelona”. 2016 49th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), pages 2983–2989, Jan 2016. D O I : 10.1109/HICSS.2016.373.

  • Mila Gascó-Hernandez, “Building a smart city: Lessons from Barcelona.”, Commun. ACM, 61(4):50–57, March 2018. ISSN 0001-0782. D O I : 10.1145/3117800. URL http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3117800 .

Python Program Example: Simple Population Simulation

eJournal: uffmm.org, ISSN 2567-6458, 30.Dec 2018
Email: info@uffmm.org
Author: Gerd Doeben-Henisch
Email: gerd@doeben-henisch.de

CONTEXT

In a preceding post I have described a simple way to install the python software as part of a integrated development environment. In this post I show a simple program to simulate the increase/ decrease of a population with nearly no parameters. It can be used as a starting point for further discussions and developments.

HOW TO MAKE IT

Of one has installed (in case of windows) the winpython software as described above and one has selected the ‘spyder.exe’ module from the folder of the winpython software) either directly (by double clicking) or one clicks the icon on the task bar (which one has placed there before), then one has the spyder working environment on the screen.

spyder software screen appearance
spyder software screen appearance

In the left subscreen one can now edit the program (by copy th source code below and paste it into the window) and then one can test the software by clicking on the green run button (alternatively: pressing F5).

Then the python console will be activated in the sub-window in the lower right corner. One has to enter the required values. After the input the console window will show the numbers as well as the graph.

THE PROGRAM SOURCE CODE

#!/usr/bin/env python3
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
“””
Created on Wed Jan 2 19:34:43 2019

@author: gerd doeben-henisch
Email: gerd@doeben-henisch.de
“””

##################################
# pop1()
###################################
#
# IDEA
#
# Simple program to compute the increase/ decrease of a population with
# the parameters population number (p), birth-rate (br), death-rate (dr),
# mirgration Plus (migrPlus), and migration Minus (migrMinus)
#

#######################################
# Used modules

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

#########################################
# Defining a function pop1()

def pop1(p,br,dr,migrPlus,migrMinus):

p=p+(p*br)-(p*dr)+migrPlus-migrMinus

return p

###################################
# Asking for input values
#
# input() creates a strng which has to be converted into an int()

baseYear = int(input(‘Basisjahr als Zahl ? ‘))

p = int(input(‘Bevölkerung als Zahl ‘))

br = float(input(‘Geburtenrate in % ‘))

dr = float(input(‘Sterberate in % ‘))

migrPlus = int(input(‘Zuwanderung Zahl ‘))
migrMinus = int(input(‘Abwanderung Zahl ‘))

n = int(input(‘Wieviele Jahre voraus ? ‘))

############################################
# processing the data
#
# creating a range called ‘run’ for the years to compute

run = np.arange(1, n+1, 1)

####################################
# pop is a ‘list’ to collect the pop-values for every year

pop = []

########################################
# The first element of pop is the base year
pop.append(p)

######################################
# Compute the changing values for the population p and store these in pop
# Use for this computation the function pop1() defined before

for i in run:
p=pop1(p,br,dr,migrPlus,migrMinus)
pop.append(p)

##############################################
# Print the content of pop for the user to show
# the different years with their pop-values

for i in range(n+1):
print(‘Jahr %5d = Einw. %8d \n’ %(baseYear+i, pop[i]) )

##############################################
# Make the numbers visible as a graph

plt.figure(1)
plt.axis([0, len(run)+1, 1, max(pop)])

run2 = np.arange(0, n+1, 1)
plt.plot(run2, pop, ‘bo’)

plt.show()
plt.close()

EXAMPLE RUNS

EXAMPLE 1

Shows a population with a lower birth rate than death rate but a positive migration outcome. (Bevölkerung = population, Zahl = number, Gebrtenrate = biirth rate, Sterberate = death rate, Zuwanderung = migration plus, Abwanderung = migration minus, Wieviele Jahre voraus = how many years forcasting)

Bevölkerung als Zahl 1000

Geburtenrate in % 0.15

Sterberate in % 0.17

Zuwanderung Zahl 200

Abwanderung Zahl 100

Wieviele Jahre voraus ? 20

Jahr 2019 = Einw. 1000

Jahr 2020 = Einw. 1080

Jahr 2021 = Einw. 1158

Jahr 2022 = Einw. 1235

Jahr 2023 = Einw. 1310

Jahr 2024 = Einw. 1384

Jahr 2025 = Einw. 1456

Jahr 2026 = Einw. 1527

Jahr 2027 = Einw. 1596

Jahr 2028 = Einw. 1665

Jahr 2029 = Einw. 1731

Jahr 2030 = Einw. 1797

Jahr 2031 = Einw. 1861

Jahr 2032 = Einw. 1923

Jahr 2033 = Einw. 1985

Jahr 2034 = Einw. 2045

Jahr 2035 = Einw. 2104

Jahr 2036 = Einw. 2162

Jahr 2037 = Einw. 2219

Jahr 2038 = Einw. 2275

Jahr 2039 = Einw. 2329

example 1 - increasing population
example 1 – increasing population

EXAMPLE 2

Shows a population with a lower birth rate than death rate and a negative migration outcome. (Bevölkerung = population, Zahl = number, Gebrtenrate = biirth rate, Sterberate = death rate, Zuwanderung = migration plus, Abwanderung = migration minus, Wieviele Jahre voraus = how many years forcasting)

Basisjahr als Zahl ? 2019

Bevölkerung als Zahl 1000

Geburtenrate in % 0.15

Sterberate in % 0.17

Zuwanderung Zahl 100

Abwanderung Zahl 120

Wieviele Jahre voraus ? 30
Jahr 2019 = Einw. 1000

Jahr 2020 = Einw. 960

Jahr 2021 = Einw. 920

Jahr 2022 = Einw. 882

Jahr 2023 = Einw. 844

Jahr 2024 = Einw. 807

Jahr 2025 = Einw. 771

Jahr 2026 = Einw. 736

Jahr 2027 = Einw. 701

Jahr 2028 = Einw. 667

Jahr 2029 = Einw. 634

Jahr 2030 = Einw. 601

Jahr 2031 = Einw. 569

Jahr 2032 = Einw. 538

Jahr 2033 = Einw. 507

Jahr 2034 = Einw. 477

Jahr 2035 = Einw. 447

Jahr 2036 = Einw. 418

Jahr 2037 = Einw. 390

Jahr 2038 = Einw. 362

Jahr 2039 = Einw. 335

Jahr 2040 = Einw. 308

Jahr 2041 = Einw. 282

Jahr 2042 = Einw. 256

Jahr 2043 = Einw. 231

Jahr 2044 = Einw. 206

Jahr 2045 = Einw. 182

Jahr 2046 = Einw. 159

Jahr 2047 = Einw. 135

Jahr 2048 = Einw. 113

Jahr 2049 = Einw. 90

example 2 - decreasing population
example 2 – decreasing population

QUANTUM THEORY (QT). Basic elements

eJournal: uffmm.org, ISSN 2567-6458, 2.January 2019
Email: info@uffmm.org
Author: Gerd Doeben-Henisch
Email:
gerd@doeben-henisch.de

CONTEXT

This is a continuation from the post WHY QT FOR AAI? explaining the motivation why to look to quantum theory (QT) in the case of the AAI paradigm. After approaching QT from a philosophy of science perspective (see the post QUANTUM THEORY (QT). BASIC PROPERTIES) giving a ‘birds view’ of the relationship between a QT and the presupposed ‘real world’ and digging a bit into the first person view inside an observer we are here interested in the formal machinery of QT. For this we follow Grifftiths in his chapter 1.

QT BASIC ELEMENTS

MEASUREMENT

  1. The starting point of a quantum theory QT are ‘phenomena‘, which “lack any description in classical physics”, a kind of things “which human beings cannot observe directly”. To measure such phenomena one needs highly sophisticated machines, which poses the problem, that the interpretation of possible ‘measurement data’ in terms of a quantum theory depends highly on the understanding of the working of the used measurement apparatus. (cf. p.8)
  2. This problem is well known in philosophy of science: (i) one wants to built a new theory T. (ii) For this theory one needs appropriate measurement data MD. (iii) The measurement as such needs a well defined procedure including different kinds of pre-defined objects and artifacts. The description of the procedure including the artifacts (which can be machines) is a theory of its own called measurement theory T*. (iv) Thus one needs a theory T* to enable a new theory T.
  3. In the case of QT one has the special case that QT itself has to be part of the measurement theory T*, i.e. QT subset T*. But, as Griffiths points out, the measurement problem in QT is even deeper; it is not only the conceptual dependency of QT from its measurement theory T*, but in the case of QT does the measurement apparatus directly interact with the target objects of QT because the measurement apparatus is itself part of the atomic and sub-atomic world which is the target. (cf. p.8) This has led to include the measurement as ‘stochastic time development’ explicitly into the QT. (cf. p.8) In his book Griffiths follows the strategy to deal with the ‘collapse of the wave function’ within the theoretical level, because it does not take place “in the experimental physicist’s laboratory”. (cf. p.9)
  4. As a consequence of these considerations Griffiths develops the fundamental principles in the chapters 2-16 without making any reference to measurement.

PRE-KNOWLEDGE

  1. Besides the special problem of measurement in quantum mechanics there is the general problem of measurement for every kind of empirical discipline which requires a perception of the real world guided by a scientific bias called ‘scientific knowledge’! Without a theoretical pre-knowledge there is no scientific observation possible. A scientific observation needs already a pre-theory T* defining the measurement procedure as well as the pre-defined standard object as well as – eventually — an ‘appropriate’ measurement device. Furthermore, to be able to talk about some measurement data as ‘data related to an object of QT’ one needs additionally a sufficient ‘pre-knowledge’ of such an object which enables the observer to decide whether the measured data are to be classified as ‘related to the object of QT. The most convenient way to enable this is to have already a proposal for a QT as the ‘knowledge guide’ how one ‘should look’ to the measured data.

QT STATES

  1. Related to the phenomena of quantum mechanics the phenomena are in QT according to Griffiths understood as ‘particles‘ whose ‘state‘ is given by a ‘complex-valued wave function ψ(x)‘, and the collection of all possible wave functions is assumed to be a ‘complex linear vector space‘ with an ‘inner product’, known as a ‘Hilbert space‘. “Two wave functions φ(x) and ψ(x) represent ‘distinct physical states’ … if and only if they are ‘orthogonal’ in the sense that their ‘inner product is zero’. Otherwise φ(x) and ψ(x) represent incompatible states of the quantum system …” .(p.2)
  2. “A quantum property … corresponds to a subspace of the quantum Hilbert space or the projector onto this subspace.” (p.2)
  3. A sample space of mutually-exclusive possibilities is a decomposition of the identity as a sum of mutually commuting projectors. One and only one of these projectors can be a correct description of a quantum system at a given time.cf. p.3)
  4. Quantum sample spaces can be mutually incompatible. (cf. p.3)
  5. “In … quantum mechanics [a physical variable] is represented by a Hermitian operator.… a real-valued function defined on a particular sample space, or decomposition of the identity … a quantum system can be said to have a value … of a physical variable represented by the operator F if and only if the quantum wave function is in an eigenstate of F … . Two physical variables whose operators do not commute correspond to incompatible sample spaces… “.(cf. p.3)
  6. “Both classical and quantum mechanics have dynamical laws which enable one to say something about the future (or past) state of a physical system if its state is known at a particular time. … the quantum … dynamical law … is the (time-dependent) Schrödinger equation. Given some wave function ψ_0 at a time t_0 , integration of this equation leads to a unique wave function ψ_t at any other time t. At two times t and t’ these uniquely defined wave functions are related by a … time development operator T(t’ , t) on the Hilbert space. Consequently we say that integrating the Schrödinger equation leads to unitary time development.” (p.3)
  7. “Quantum mechanics also allows for a stochastic or probabilistic time development … . In order to describe this in a systematic way, one needs the concept of a quantum history … a sequence of quantum events (wave functions or sub-spaces of the Hilbert space) at successive times. A collection of mutually … exclusive histories forms a sample space or family of histories, where each history is associated with a projector on a history Hilbert space. The successive events of a history are, in general, not related to one another through the Schrödinger equation. However, the Schrödinger equation, or … the time development operators T(t’ , t), can be used to assign probabilities to the different histories belonging to a particular family.” (p.3f)

HILBERT SPACE: FINITE AND INFINITE

  1. “The wave functions for even such a simple system as a quantum particle in one dimension form an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space … [but] one does not have to learn functional analysis in order to understand the basic principles of quantum theory. The majority of the illustrations used in Chs. 2–16 are toy models with a finite-dimensional Hilbert space to which the usual rules of linear algebra apply without any qualification, and for these models there are no mathematical subtleties to add to the conceptual difficulties of quantum theory … Nevertheless, they provide many useful insights into general quantum principles.”. (p.4f)

CALCULUS AND PROBABILITY

  1. Griffiths (2003) makes considerable use of toy models with a simple discretized time dependence … To obtain … unitary time development, one only needs to solve a simple difference equation, and this can be done in closed form on the back of an envelope. (cf. p.5f)
  2. Probability theory plays an important role in discussions of the time development of quantum systems. … when using toy models the simplest version of probability theory, based on a finite discrete sample space, is perfectly adequate.” (p.6)
  3. “The basic concepts of probability theory are the same in quantum mechanics as in other branches of physics; one does not need a new “quantum probability”. What distinguishes quantum from classical physics is the issue of choosing a suitable sample space with its associated event algebra. … in any single quantum sample space the ordinary rules for probabilistic reasoning are valid. ” (p.6)

QUANTUM REASONING

  1. The important difference compared to classical mechanics is the fact that “an initial quantum state does not single out a particular framework, or sample space of stochastic histories, much less determine which history in the framework will actually occur.” (p.7) There are multiple incompatible frameworks possible and to use the ordinary rules of propositional logic presupposes to apply these to a single framework. Therefore it is important to understand how to choose an appropriate framework.(cf. p.7)

NEXT

These are the basic ingredients which Griffiths mentions in chapter 1 of his book 2013. In the following these ingredients have to be understood so far, that is becomes clear how to relate the idea of a possible history of states (cf. chapters 8ff) where the future of a successor state in a sequence of timely separated states is described by some probability.

REFERENCES

  • R.B. Griffiths. Consistent Quantum Theory. Cambridge University Press, New York, 2003

 

WHY QT FOR AAI?

eJournal: uffmm.org, ISSN 2567-6458, 2.January 2019
Email: info@uffmm.org
Author: Gerd Doeben-Henisch
Email:
gerd@doeben-henisch.de

CONTEXT

This is a continuation from the post QUANTUM THEORY (QT). BASIC PROPERTIES, where basic properties of quantum theory (QT) according to ch.27 of Griffiths (2003) have been reported. Before we dig deeper into the QT matter here a remark why we should do this at all because the main topic of the uffmm.org blog is the Actor-Actor Interaction (AAI) paradigm dealing with actors including a subset of actors which have the complexity of biological systems at least as complex as exemplars of the kind of human sapiens.

WHY QT IN THE CASE OF AAI

As Griffiths (2003) points out in his chapter 1 and chapter 27 quantum theory deals with objects which are not perceivable by the normal human sensory apparatus. It needs special measurement procedures and instrumentation to measure events related to quantum objects. Therefore the level of analysis in quantum theory is quite ‘low’ compared to the complexity hierarchies of biological systems.

Baars and Edelman (2012) address the question of the relationship of QT and biological phenomena, especially those connected to the phenomenon of human consciousness, explicitly. Their conclusion is very clear: “Current quantum-level proposals do not explain the prominent empirical features of consciousness”. (Baars and Edelman (2012):p.286)

Behind this short statement we have to accept the deep insights of modern (evolutionary and micro) biology that a main characteristics of biological systems has to be seen in their ability to overcome the fluctuating and unstable quantum properties by a more and more complex machinery which posses its own logic and its own specific dynamics.

Therefore the level of analysis for the behavior of biological systems is usually ‘far above’ the level of quantum theory.

Why then at all bother with QT in the case of the AAI paradigm?

If one looks to the AAI paradigm then one detects the concept of the actor story (AS) which assumes that reality can be conceived — and then be described – as a ‘process’ which can be analyzed as a ‘sequence of states’ characterized by decidable ‘facts’ which can ‘change in time’. A ‘change’ can occur either by some changing time measured by ‘time points’ generated by a ‘time machine’ called ‘clock’ or by some ‘inherent change’ observable as a change in some ‘facts’.

Restricting the description of the transitions of such a sequence of states to properties of classical probability theory, one detects severe limits of the descriptive power of a CPT description compared to what has to be done in an AAI analysis. (see for this the post BACKGROUND INFORMATION 27.Dec.2018: The AAI-paradigm and Quantum Logic. The Limits of Classic Probability). The limits result from the fact that actors within the AAI paradigm are in many cases ‘not static’ and ‘not deterministic’ systems which can change their structures and behavior functions in a way that the basic assumptions of CPT are no longer valid.

It remains the question whether a probability theory PT which is based on quantum theory QT is in some sense ‘better adapted’ to the AAI paradigm than Classical PT.

This question is the main perspective guiding the further encounter with QT.

See next.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

QUELLEN

  • Bernard J. Baars and David B. Edelman. Consciousness, biology, and quantum hypotheses. Physics of Life Review, 9(3):285 – 294, 2012. D O I: 10.1016/j.plrev.2012.07.001. Epub. URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22925839
  • R.B. Griffiths. Consistent Quantum Theory. Cambridge University Press, New York, 2003